A World Inside the Mind


Short post today, but a few things occurred to me as I was reading the paper on Bayesian Program Learning:

  • This form of recursive program induction starts to look suspiciously like simulation – something we do in our minds all the time.
  • Simulation may be a better framing for concept formation than via the classification route.
  • Mapping the ‘inner world’ to the ‘outer world’ seems a more sensible approach to understanding what’s going on. If you look at the paper, you also see some thought-provoking examples of new concept generation, such as the single-wheel motorbike example (in the images). This is the most exciting point of all.

A final design?

Combine all the elements together, along with ideas from my last post, and you get something that:

  1. Simulates an internal version of the world
  2. Is able to synthesize concepts and simulate the results, or literally ‘imagine’ the results – much like we do
  3. Is able to learn concepts from few examples
  4. Has memories of events in its lifetime / runtime, and can reference those events to recall the specific context of what else was happening at that time. That is, memories have deep linkage to one another.
  5. Is able to act of its own volition, i.e. in the absence of external stimulus. It may choose to kick off imagination routines – ‘dreaming’, if you will – optimize its internal connections, or do some other maintenance work in its downtime. Again, similar to how our brains do it while we sleep.

This starts to look like a pretty solid recipe for a complete cognitive architecture. Every requirement has been covered in some way or another, though in different models and in different situations. To really put the pieces together into a robust architecture will require many years of work, but it is worth exploring multi-model cognitive approaches.

If it results in a useful AI, then I’m all in.

 

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Context & Permutations


In the pursuit of Artificial General Intelligence, one of the challenges that comes up again and again is how to deal with context.  To illustrate: telling a robot to cross the street would seem simple enough.  But consider the context that five minutes ago somebody else told this robot not to cross the street because there was some kind of construction work happening on the other side.  What does the robot decide to do?  Whose instruction does it consider more important?

A robot whose ‘brain’ did not account for context properly would naively go crossing the street as soon as you told it to, ignoring whatever had come before.  This example is simple enough, but you can easily imagine other situations in which the consequences would be catastrophic.

The difficulty in modeling context in a mathematical sense is that the state space can quickly explode, meaning that the number of ways that things can occur and sequences they can occur in is essentially infinite.  Reducing these effective infinities down to manageable size is where the magic occurs.  The holy grail in his case is to have the computing of the main algorithm remain constant (or at least linear) even as the number of possible permutations of contextual state explodes.

How is this done?  Conceptually, one needs to represent things sparsely, and have the algorithm that traverses this representation only take into account a small subset of possibilities at a time.  In practice, this means representing the state space as transitions in a large graph, and only traversing small walks through the graph at any given time.  In this space-time tradeoff, space is favored heavily.

The ability to adeptly handle context is of utmost importance for current and future AIs, especially as they take on more responsibility in our world.  I hope that AI developers can form a common set of idioms for dealing with context in intelligent systems, so that they can be collaboratively improved upon.

We’ve had it all wrong.


All this time, we’ve had it all wrong.

Artificial Intelligence (AI) has been a science for over 50 years now, and in that time has accomplished some amazing things – computers that beat human players at chess and Jeopardy, find the best routes for delivery trucks, optimize drug delivery, and many other feats.  Yet the elusive holy grail of “true AI”, or “sentient AI”, “artificial general intelligence” – by whatever name, the big problem – has remained out of our grasp.

Look at what the words actually say though – artificial intelligence.  Are we sure that intelligence is really the crucial aspect to creating a sentient machine?

I claim that we’ve had it wrong.  Think about it: intelligence is a mere mechanical form, a set of axioms that yield observations and outcomes.  Hypothesis, action, adjustment – ad infinitum.  The theory has been if we could just create the recursively self-optimizing intelligence kernel, BOOM! – instant singularity.  And we’d have our AGI to run our robots, our homes, our shipping lanes, and everything imaginable.

The problem with this picture is that it assumes intelligence is the key underlying factor.  It is not.

I claim the key factor is…

…wait for it…

Consciousness.

Consciousness might be defined as how ‘aware’ an entity is of itself and its environment, which might be measured by how well it was able to distinguish things like where it ends and its environment begins, a sense of agency with reference to past actions it performed, and a unified experience of its surroundings that gives it a constantly evolving sense of ‘now’.  This may overlap with intelligence, but it is a different goal: looking in the mirror and thinking “that’s me” is different than being able to beat humans at chess.  A robot understanding “I broke the vase” is different than an intelligence calculating the Voronoi diagram of the pottery’s broken pieces lying on the floor.

Giulio Tononi’s work rings a note in harmony with these ideas.  Best of all, he and others discuss practically useful metrics of consciousness.  Whether Integrated Information Theory is the root of all consciousness or not is immaterial; the point is that this is solid work in a distinctly new direction, and approaches the fundamental problems of AI in a completely new way.

Tononi’s work may be a viable (if perhaps only approximate) solution to the binding problem, and in that way could be immensely useful in designing systems that have a persisting sense of their evolving environment, leading us to sentience.  It is believable that intelligence may be an emergent property of consciousness, but it seems unlikely that intelligence alone is the ingredient for consciousness itself, and that somehow a certain ‘amount’ of intelligence will yield sentience.  One necessarily takes precedence over the other.

Given this, from now on I’ll be focusing my work on Artificial Consciousness, which will differ from Artificial Intelligence namely in its goals and performance metrics: instead of how effectively an agent solved a problem, how aware it was of its position in the problem space; instead of how little error it can achieve, how little ambiguity it can achieve in understanding its own boundaries of existence (where the program ends and the OS begins, where the robot’s body ends and the environment begins).

I would urge you to read Tononi’s work and Adam Barrett’s work here.  My Information Theory Toolkit (https://github.com/MaxwellRebo/ittk) has several of the functions you’ll need to start experimenting on systems with a few more lines of code (namely, use Kullback-Leibler divergence).

In the coming months, I’ll be adding ways to calculate the Information Integration of abstracted systems, or its Phi value.  This is NP-Hard, so it will have to remain in the domain of small systems for now.  Nonetheless, I believe if we start designing systems with the intent of maximizing their integration, it will yield some system topologies that have more beneficial properties than our usual ‘flat’ system design.

Artificial Intelligence will no doubt continue to give us great advances in many areas, but I for one am embarking on a quest for something subtly but powerfully different: Artificial Consciousness.

Note: If you have some programming skill and would like to contribute to the Information Theory Toolkit, please fork the repository and send me an email so we can discuss possibilities.  I’ll continue to work on this as I can.